Answering 8 Frequently Asked Questions About COSE’s MEWA

To provide you with a more competitive set of healthcare coverage solutions for your company and your employees, COSE has partnered with Medical Mutual to offer the COSE Health and Wellness Trust, also known as the COSE MEWA. This is a multiple employer welfare arrangement (MEWA) designed as a self-funded benefit option for businesses with 50 or fewer employees. Business owners with no employees are eligible to apply.

Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll

    Listed below are nine of the most frequent questions we receive from members about how the COSE MEWA works and how it may be a good benefit option for small businesses. Looking for additional insight? Visit our COSE MEWA information page.

    Question 1: What is the COSE Health and Wellness Trust?

    Answer: The COSE Health and Wellness Trust is a new way to cover your employees’ health benefits with some great financial benefits for you. It’s a self-funded, Multiple Employer Health Welfare Arrangement (MEWA) health plan for COSE members and designed with small business needs in mind. The COSE MEWA was exclusively developed by COSE and the Greater Cleveland Partnership to help its small business members and their employees with the increasing cost of healthcare benefits.

    Question 2: Who can apply?

    Answer: You must be a member of the Greater Cleveland Partnership’s Council of Smaller Enterprises (COSE) to apply for coverage in the COSE MEWA, and your business must have 50 or fewer employees. Business owners and partnerships with no employees are also eligible to apply. Please contact your broker or our direct sales team at (888)310-6262 or COSEbenefits@medmutual.com.

    Question 3: What are the benefits of using the COSE MEWA for my group’s health coverage?

    Answer: The COSE MEWA was designed to manage your healthcare benefits cost, and provide benefit plans that may be a better fit for small business owners and their employees. Because the COSE MEWA is a self-funded plan, it has many benefits, including:

    • The COSE MEWA offers 18 different plan options with varying deductibles and coinsurance designed exclusively for the COSE MEWA, and because MEWAs are not subject to some of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) mandated benefits and taxes, it helps to keep costs lower.

    • The cost of your benefits better reflect the unique health of you and your employees, recognizing that a healthier team should create a better benefits cost outcome.

    • All COSE MEWA benefit options are tied to the same Medical Mutual network of doctors and hospitals that COSE members have accessed for years.

    • And, because we have arranged to have Medical Mutual administer these benefits, your employees will still have access to Medical Mutual’s Customer Care team.

    • In addition, we know that the security of your data and information is important. So, as an additional benefit, the COSE MEWA also offers identity theft resolution services coverage and remediation services at no additional cost.

    Question 4: What are the advantages of a self-funded plan?

    Answer: There are several advantages to small business owners with a self-funded option:

    • The COSE MEWA offers rate stability, the flexibility of benefit options and recognition of preferred health status.

    • The COSE MEWA may be less expensive for your group than similar ACA plans because it considers criteria unique to your employees such as medical history.

    • Your disclosed pre-existing conditions will still be covered.

    Question 5: How will my group funding rates be determined?

    Answer: Unlike Community rated ACA rates that are solely determined by age, location, family size and smoker status, your group rates will be based on additional factors, such as medical history and gender. The expanded criteria of the COSE MEWA for pricing your benefits allow us to tailor the costs to the unique characteristics of your group, recognizing the preferred health status that you may have.

    Question 6: How is the COSE MEWA regulated and protected?

    Answer: The COSE MEWA is regulated by the Ohio Department of Insurance (ODI). These state regulators monitor the COSE MEWA to ensure appropriate surplus is available to cover unforeseen risk and protect its solvency. The COSE MEWA also maintains stop-loss insurance coverage to provide additional protection to plan participants. You can feel confident about the stability of the COSE MEWA as it is closely monitored by the Internal Revenue Service, the Department of Labor and the ODI.

    Question 7: Do these plans comply with the ACA?

    Answer: These plans comply with all ACA mandates applicable to self-funded plans as well as certain state requirements for MEWAs. The COSE MEWA covers ACA-compliant Essential Health Benefits with the exception of pediatric dental coverage.

    Question 8: Who can I contact for more information about plans or to get a quote?

    Answer: For more information or to get a quote, please contact your broker or contact the Medical Mutual COSE Benefits team at (440) 878-5930 or call (888)310-6262. You can also email questions to COSEbenefits@medmutual.com.

    Pre-Check
    Next up: Avoid becoming another Fire-Loss Statistic
  • More in HR
  • Avoid becoming another Fire-Loss Statistic

    Losses as a result of fire damage put a big dent into business operations every year. U.S. fires resulted in an estimated $11.6 billion in direct property loss during 2014, according to the National Fire Protection Association. On average, a civilian fire death occurred somewhere in the country every two hours and 41 minutes. There are a number of steps businesses can take to avoid becoming another fire-loss statistic, according to the Ohio Department of Commerce. These steps are centered around four main themes.

    Losses as a result of fire damage put a big dent into business operations every year.

    Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll

    U.S. fires resulted in an estimated $11.6 billion in direct property loss during 2014, according to the National Fire Protection Association. On average, a civilian fire death occurred somewhere in the country every two hours and 41 minutes.

    There are a number of steps businesses can take to avoid becoming another fire-loss statistic, according to the Ohio Department of Commerce. These steps are centered around four main themes

    Create a fire safety plan

    It’s important that businesses have in place a fire safety plan that is reviewed annually. This plan will help employees identify actions that need to be taken to help prevent a fire. This plan should include:

    • designating an outdoor central meeting place that is well-marked;
    • establishing a process by which employees who are trained to use fire extinguishers are trained annually; and
    • acquainting the local fire department with your facility, its location and potential specific hazards.

    Housekeeping

    Keeping a tidy workplace environment can also help support the fire protection cause. Employees and employers should:

    • keep personal workspaces clean;
    • check heating units at least annually;
    • empty waste containers daily;
    • turn off non-essential electrical equipment at the end of each day;
    • ensure extension cords are the correct size and used for portable equipment only; and
    • check electrical outlets regularly to ensure they are not overloaded.

    Storage

    Workplace materials must be stored safely. This can be accomplished by:

    • keeping combustible materials at least 3 feet away from heat sources;
    • disposing hazardous materials properly; and
    • maintaining at least 24 inches between the top of a stack of materials and the ceiling.

    Fire Protection

    If fire does occur, it’s important to be prepared. Some fire protection tips include:

    • clearly marking all exit doors and removing any potential obstructions from the door;
    • allowing exit doors to be opened from the direction of exit traffic without the use of a key or any special knowledge or effort;
    • mounting fire extinguishers in accessible and identified locations;
    • keeping a space of at least 18 inches below sprinkler heads and checking the sprinklers annually;
    • testing emergency lighting every month; and 
    • keeping doors closed when rooms are not occupied (closed doors can act as a barrier to smoke and fire).

    Escape tips

    In addition, it’s important to keep in mind what should be done to escape a fire:

    1. If you see smoke, try another way to escape. If you have to escape through smoke, stay close to the floor.
    2. Check doorknobs and the space between the door and frame with the back of your hand before opening closed doors. If it is cool, open the door slowly but be ready to quickly close the door if smoke comes through.
    3. Elevators should not be used during a fire.
    4. Once you're out, STAY OUT. If someone else is trapped inside, tell the Fire Department. Fire gasses in the building are toxic and can kill.

    Pre-Check
    Next up: Tips for Your Business: Be Disaster Ready
  • More in HR
  • Tips for Your Business: Be Disaster Ready

    July 8th was an anxious day for some and a fearful one for others. During the course of a four-hour span, three well-known institutions – United Airlines, the New York Stock Exchange and The Wall Street Journal – were suddenly offline, leaving their customers, partners and the global market fretting over a possible larger-scale issue. While each of these organizations continue to consider the effect of these outages and what could have been done to prevent it, all businesses can learn a valuable lesson from this calamity. Ask yourself: Are you prepared for a disruption to your business?

    July 8th was an anxious day for some and a fearful one for others. During the course of a four-hour span, three well-known institutions – United Airlines, the New York Stock Exchange and The Wall Street Journal – were suddenly offline, leaving their customers, partners and the global market fretting over a possible larger-scale issue.

    Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll

    While each of these organizations continue to consider the effect of these outages and what could have been done to prevent it, all businesses can learn a valuable lesson from this calamity. Ask yourself: Are you prepared for a disruption to your business?

    The ever-increasing reliance on technology has brought business continuity and disaster recovery to the forefront of many businesses, presenting a challenge to IT and business leaders as to how to create an effective disaster recovery (DR) plan. 

    The first step in creating a DR plan is identifying and understanding the types of common disaster events that can affect your business, including:

    • Environmental – tornado, hurricane, snowstorm, flood, and fire.
    • Deliberate – terrorism, sabotage, theft, arson (internal personnel or external).
    • System Failure – hacker, employee destruction.
    • Other Emergency Situation – public transportation, governmental, legal.

    Once these events have been classified, establishing a DR checklist is the next step. Below is a standard outline of a checklist:

    • Justification – Define the Executive Sponsors. Executive Sponsors are the business leaders within your organization responsible for creating a DR plan.  Business leaders must determine the timeframe for recovery (how long can the business be unavailable), as well as establish a budget to support the initiative. In general, this phase begins the process of establishing a business impact analysis, which is a risk assessment of the impact to your business should a disaster occur.
    • Inventory – Document your entire IT environment (applications, network elements, access points, data, etc.).  You will also need to understand how the applications and data are being accessed and used by employees, partners and customers. 
    • Prioritization – Prioritize applications in tiers, from the most to least critical.
    • Budgeting – Forecast the initial setup fees (capital expense) as well as the operating cost of managing a disaster recovery plan. Operating costs include training, testing, fees to host the DR environment and the applicable software licensing fees.
    • DR Planning – Formalize an action plan in the event a disaster impacts your business. Elements of this plan should include an appropriate alternative location to operate from (technology platform and people), processes and procedures for declaring a disaster, and individual and/or team-based responsibilities in the event a disaster is declared.
    • Maintenance – Be diligent in revising the plan as technology and your business evolve and change. Test your DR plan annually and review the outcomes to understand what gaps occurred and what risks can be mitigated, and update the plan accordingly.

    Once the dust settled from the outages of July 8th and the cause of each disruption surfaced, the concern of a terrorist cyber-attack was diminished. It was revealed United Airlines suffered a network outage that caused the carrier to ground flights by more than an hour, the NYSE’s online trading platform crashed due to a misguided software update and WSJ.com was overwhelmed by traffic due to investors and the market seeking information as to why the NYSE trading environment was offline.  

    Even a small scale disaster can impact business on many levels. In the event of a disaster or disruption to your business, do you have a plan in place to continue your day-to-day operations? 

    David Saliba is vice president of Expedient, a leading provider of cloud computing, managed services and colocation in Cleveland.

    This article originally appeared in the August 3, 2015, edition of Small Business Matters.


    Pre-Check
    Next up: "Best Benefits Decision I Ever Made…"
  • More in HR
  • "Best Benefits Decision I Ever Made…"

    “Joining COSE’s group-rated Workers’ Comp Program has helped me in my business in so many ways. Not only has COSE saved me money on premiums, but they understand my needs and can fight for me better than any other program. I’m not just another number among many other businesses to them. They provide individualized attention and navigate my problems for me, leaving me to continue focusing on what I’m passionate about – my restaurants.”  - Eric Williams, owner, Momocho and El Carnicero, and partner, Happy Dog and Jack Flaps

    Share
  • ">Email
  • Compass Payroll
    “Joining COSE’s group-rated Workers’ Comp Program has helped me in my business in so many ways. Not only has COSE saved me money on premiums, but they understand my needs and can fight for me better than any other program. I’m not just another number among many other businesses to them. They provide individualized attention and navigate my problems for me, leaving me to continue focusing on what I’m passionate about – my restaurants.”

     - Eric Williams, owner, Momocho and El Carnicero, and partner, Happy Dog and Jack Flaps

    With his passion for good food and his desire to support his hometown and the local economy, Eric Williams has independently opened or partnered in some of Cleveland’s hottest restaurants in the last few years. He has encountered a few bumps along the way, with new and different challenges for each new operation, and relied on COSE’s workers’ comp team to help him navigate the obstacles.

    Get a free quote on COSE’s group-rated Workers’ Compensation Program.

    This article originally appeared in the March 23, 2015, edition of Small Business Matters.



    Pre-Check
    Next up: COSE WebEd Series: Building A Better Workplace with Policies & Procedures
  • More in HR
  • COSE WebEd Series: Building A Better Workplace with Policies & Procedures

    Learn how to build a better workplace in this webinar presented by Elizabeth A. Crosby from Buckley King.


    Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll
    Next up: BWC Safety, Wellness Programming to be Enhanced as Part of Latest ‘Billion Back’
  • More in HR
  • BWC Safety, Wellness Programming to be Enhanced as Part of Latest ‘Billion Back’

    The Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation announced a $44-million investment in workplace safety, health, and wellness. The $44-million spend will extend the existing $15-million Safety Intervention Grant program another two years. An additional part of the $44 million would provide $6 million per year for a health and wellness program for workers at small employers (50 or fewer employees). BWC will contract with a third-party vendor to provide services including smoking cessation, health coaching and chronic disease management.

    Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll

    The initiative is part of the “Billion Back” rebate plan proposed by the Governor that was approved by the BWC's board of directors last Friday. A BWC budget bill (HB 27) is expected to be approved by the Ohio legislature by the end of June.

    Private employers are reportedly due $967 million and public employers $133 million, including $92 million to local governments and $41 million to school districts. Eligible employers will begin receiving checks in July totaling 66% of premiums for the policy year that ended June 30, 2016. To be eligible for the rebate, employers should ensure their policies are active and in good standing with BWC. Lapses in coverage or outstanding balances might affect rebate eligibility. Employers in COSE’s Group Rating and Group Retrospective Rating Plans would still be eligible for rebates.

    Pre-Check
  • More in HR