COSE WebEd Series: Anatomy of a Perfect Wellness Program

Did you know 80% of a company’s health insurance claims come from only 20% of its employees? Ensure a healthier workforce at your business by following these steps to creating a perfect wellness program.

With an aging population, chronic disease on the rise and insurance premiums increasing, most employers know by now the benefits of a wellness program. But many are often still faced with the challenges of starting one or effectively engaging staff in a plan that works. During a recent COSE WebEd Series webinar titled “Anatomy of a Perfect Wellness Program,” hChoices President Steve Pelton explained what features need to be included in a company wellness program.

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    According to Pelton, 80% of a company’s claims come from only 20% of its employees. So, connecting with the group of people at greatest risk of suffering from health-related issues (and therefore filing health-related claims) is in everyone’s best interests, but doing so can be sometimes difficult.

    Pelton identified the following obstacles companies are facing when it comes to successful wellness programs:

    • motivating the well, not the sick by only offering the bare minimum, such as biometric wellness screenings once a year;
    • inadequate access to health monitoring with secure tracking;
    • insufficient educational opportunities;
    • difficulty building awareness and engagement; and
    • limited time and resources

    Change the conversation

    Companies need to overcome these obstacles by changing the conversation and the tactics used around wellness. Instead of talking with employees about needing to change what claims are filed, managers need to be talking with their staff about why their health is important. It must be an employee-centric approach to discussing wellness.

    An effective, successful wellness program will always be:

    • Inclusive: It can’t only be available to people on the company’s healthcare plan or only for the employees themselves. A good program will be available to everyone in the company, as well as their dependents.
    • Multidimensional: It must include not only the aspects of wellness related to physical health, but should also have financial wellness components.
    • Targeted: Cookie cutter programs don’t address the specific needs of the participants or the employer. Meet participants where they are; some people might already be on the track to good health, while others need more motivation and resources.
    • Personalized: Included in the program should be things that have been needed or wanted in the past by both the employees and employer. Technological algorithms can help deliver a personalized plan that will work best for individual companies.
    • Responsive: Ensure wellness program information is user-friendly and can be accessed across all forms of technology. This will increase participation and is another way to reach out to dependents.
    • Fun: Companies should use challenges, incentives and other engaging tactics to create a buzz about their program.
    • Available 24/7: If people can access it whenever it’s convenient for them, they’re more likely to do it.
    • Visible: The data needs to be made available so that both employees and employers know their effort is paying off. Share results and help spread the effectiveness (and therefore increase participation) of the program.

    Secure third-party help

    Pelton strongly recommends instituting the assistance of a third party to accomplish all of these steps. A HIPPA-compliant outside broker can hold the data on employee health and assist in the company’s wellness goals using technology, employee education and social engagement. He also suggests that companies secure testimonials from people participating in their wellness programs to promote effectiveness and drive participation.

    COSE has partnered up with hchoices to offer a turnkey wellness program called Y’s Choice, which includes such aspects as:

    • health assessments;
    • wellness challenges;
    • reporting and incentive tracking;
    • coaching and dietary consulting;
    • wellness portal and custom learning system; and
    • discounted memberships to YMCA.

    Pelton also explained the Workplace Wellness Grant Program through the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation, which provides $15,000 to employers wanting to institute a wellness program.

    Like what you see here? We’ve got webinar coverage on a variety of other topics, too! View previous COSE WebEd Series webinars by clicking here.

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    Business Week recently recognized the CLE as the hottest IT jobs market in the country and the NEOSA Quarterly Survey shows continued demand for IT talent in the region. Competition for talent is intense. Tech companies need to have strong, talented pools of staff on hand to take advantage of growth opportunities. So, adding staff is critical in the current environment, but developing your current staff is key to success as well. 

    Business Week recently recognized the CLE as the hottest IT jobs market in the country and the NEOSA Quarterly Survey shows continued demand for IT talent in the region. Competition for talent is intense. Tech companies need to have strong, talented pools of staff on hand to take advantage of growth opportunities. So, adding staff is critical in the current environment, but developing your current staff is key to success as well. 

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    But what can your company do about it? What are new, creative ways to attract talent to your company? And what are unique ways that companies are developing their internal talent to fill gaps in expertise or headcount? 

    Listen here.


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    Walk the walk: Genuine leadership is key to creating a productive work environment.  If you demonstrate the same drive, passion, and commitment to the goals and vision of the company that you expect from your employees on a daily basis, you will inspire the same from your team. 

    Encourage dialogue: Make yourself available to your staff and keep lines of communication open.  Employees want to be able to speak their minds. By presenting opportunities to share ideas and voice concerns, you help establish trust and respect. On the flip side, be sure to communicate with your team as openly and honestly as possible. 

    Recognize achievements: Consistent recognition of a job well done, whether as a casual mention or as part of a formal employee recognition program, is a great no-cost way to acknowledge an employee's efforts. According to the 2015 Employee Recognition Report by the Society for Human Resource Management, values-based employee recognition programs are helping employers create a stronger culture and more human workplace.

    Offer self-improvement opportunities : Expanding and improving an employees’ skills and knowledge through professional development can benefit your company greatly while enhancing job satisfaction.  Professional development can encompass various learning opportunities, including formal training, certifications and topical seminars and conferences. 

    Incentivize your team: Whether through cash or non-cash rewards, incentivizing your team can boost employee morale and the overall corporate culture.  If pay increases or bonuses aren’t in the budget, consider offering paid time off, flexible work hours, remote work opportunities, employee celebrations, and goal-oriented contests with fun prizes.  

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    Next up: Employment Lawsuits: 10 Ways to Safeguard Your Business
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    Learn the 10 things you have to know about mitigating exposure to employment-related lawsuits.

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    Employment-related lawsuits are difficult to deal with: Emotions run high with personal issues often brought into play. Even when claims are meritless, defense costs can be substantial. The impact on morale and reputation can also be significant. The following 10 steps help reduce these issues in your business and strengthen your defense if an action is brought.

    1. Invest in an employee handbook

    This includes employment-at-will, harassment and discrimination provisions. Every employer should invest in an employee handbook. While this might seem like an unnecessary expense, having policies in place that address termination of employment, discrimination and harassment can reduce potential exposure in employment-related matters. At a minimum, a handbook should include an employment-at-will statement and a zero-tolerance policy toward discrimination and harassment. While sample policies are available, employers should ensure all policies are compliant with applicable state and federal laws. Ideally, an employment attorney should draft and/or review the handbook.

    Example: The COO maintained only one copy of an old, out-of-date handbook that was no longer compliant with state or federal laws in her office. The employees knew it was in the COO’s office and were not comfortable accessing it. When an employee filed a lawsuit, the handbook’s provisions were not enforced because they were (1) in conflict with the law and (2) because it had not been disseminated to employees.

    2. Ensure consistency

    Maintain consistency with a uniform review of all adverse employment decisions. A neutral party within your organization should review all such decisions to ensure the emotional component is minimized, and consequences of poor performance or misbehavior are being consistently evaluated.

    Example: Two supervisors had the ability to hire and fire employees on their respective teams. One strictly enforced attendance rules and terminated two employees who were late to work on three occasions. The other supervisor was more lax, allowing her team to arrive to work late or leave early. The terminated employees, who were both older than 40, filed suit alleging age discrimination, pointing out many employees younger than 40 had also been tardy on several occasions, but weren’t terminated.

    3. Train employees on employment-related issues

    All employees should receive basic training on employment-related issues. Training options are available online and in-person, or you can opt for an attorney to perform training at your organization.

    Train supervisors to:

    • Take every complaint seriously.
    • Immediately refer every complaint to HR or the designated employee and investigate in a timely, thorough manner.
    • Be fair and consistent.
    • Document performance issues and be honest on performance evaluations.
    • Be vigilant to stop conduct that could draw allegations of discrimination or harassment.

    Train non-supervisory employees to understand:

    • There is a process in place to file a harassment or discrimination complaint.
    • These are the types of behavior that are unacceptable in the workplace.
    • There is an employer’s handbook and/or policies and procedures in place.

    Example: Every day, after business close, employees would stay to complete standard end-of-business day duties. This hour was typically filled with sexual banter among the employees. The manager was present, but never took steps to stop these conversations. A new employee was hired and terminated after only a few months when it became clear that she was not meeting required service standards. She filed a discrimination charge, claiming sexual harassment because of what took place at the end of the workday.

    4. Document everything

    Employment claims often come down to one’s word against another’s. When an employer maintains detailed documentation created close in time to incidents in question, it’s a much stronger defense in any subsequent claims. Documentation should be clear, concise, free from emotion or unnecessary commentary, and include performance issues and the resulting consequences. Ideally, the employee should sign the documentation to acknowledge issues were brought to his or her attention. Performance evaluations of all employees should be done honestly. While it might be easier to simply give average or above average evaluations, it’s then difficult to defend any action by an employee where performance is relevant.

    Example: A woman complained to the president that she was being sexually harassed by her supervisor. The president met with the supervisor who promised to stop. The president did not document the conversation. The behavior continued. Months later, the woman was terminated for performance issues. She alleged she was fired in retaliation for complaining about sexual harassment. She kept detailed notes and established she complained to the president.

    She alleged he did nothing as a result and conspired with her supervisor to get rid of her. Because the president had no documentation of his meetings with the woman or her supervisor, her version of events was more believable.

    5. Watch workplace jokes and banter

    Most adults spend a huge chunk of their waking hours on the job and want to be able to enjoy relationships with their co-workers. While a collegial atmosphere is to be encouraged, it can quickly cross the line into actionable behavior. Consider the following comments: “Pregnant again? How many kids do you have?!” “You’re 50? Over the hill!” “As an African-American, what do you think of Obama?” “How was your vacation? Wish I could have seen you in a bikini!” “We need to figure out how to attract Gen-X employees.”

    All were intended as harmless banter; however, they were used as evidence against an employer in a lawsuit brought by a former employee. Be vigilant in ensuring that employee interactions are professional and appropriate.

    Example: A supervisor planned a 50th birthday party for an employee, including an “over the hill” banner, a black cake decorated with a tombstone and numerous age-related gag gifts. Shortly after the party, the employee was fired. He sued, alleging age discrimination, using the events at his birthday party as evidence of his supervisor’s discriminatory intent.

    6. Recognize pitfalls in pre- and post-employment time frames

    The interview process can be challenging as an employer attempts to gain information about prospective employees to determine whether they are suitable for a job. However, it is prohibited to ask about certain topics, such as disability, age, children, marital status, etc., and illegal to make hiring decisions based on such information. Interviewers should focus on asking only work-appropriate questions. Once an employment relationship has ended, care must still be taken. Final paychecks and payment for accrued vacation time must be made in a timely manner based on state law. Calls for references should be handled by one person and dealt with in a consistent manner. No specifics regarding a termination should be discussed with other employees or customers.

    Example: After an employee was terminated for dishonest conduct, the employer received a reference call on the employee. The employee provided a detailed and extremely negative reference that resulted in a defamation lawsuit.

    7. Regulate Internet and email use

    In most workplaces, employees have email and Internet access. Be vigilant that these tools are used in an appropriate manner. Have a policy prohibiting the access of pornographic or inappropriate websites and consider software that blocks inappropriate websites. Employees should be warned emails are never truly deleted and all email communication should be conducted in a professional manner.

    Example: The CFO was engaged in a consensual affair with an employee, communicating multiple times a day via corporate email. When the employee broke off the affair, the CFO continued to email her constantly, begging her to come back. Months later, the employee applied for a promotion and did not get it. She quit and filed a lawsuit alleging sexual harassment and retaliation. Their thousands of emails figured prominently in the case.

    8. Be aware of workplace violence issues

    An employer must be vigilant and safety conscious, understanding they have an obligation to provide a safe workplace and to take reasonable steps to ensure employee safety while on the job, especially in the event of a termination or other event that might cause anger on the part of an employee or even a customer. It might involve hiring security for the day or simply handling a termination privately with respect for the employee’s emotions.

    Example: An employee who was a “cutter” would bring razor blades to work and, when stressed, would go into the bathroom to cut her skin. She told several co-workers, who informed management. Concerned with her bringing sharp objects to work that could be used as weapons, management warned her not to bring them to work and encouraged her to seek counseling. Days later, she was seen with a knife in the bathroom and terminated. She later filed suit for disability discrimination.

    9. Review FLSA status of employees

    The Fair Labor Standards Act requires that employees be properly categorized as exempt (paid a salary and not eligible for overtime pay) or nonexempt (paid by the hour and entitled to overtime pay if work is in excess of a certain number of hours per day or week). Failure to properly categorize jobs can lead to an employer being required to reimburse an employee or class of employees for unpaid overtime allegedly earned over a period.

    Example: A group of employees filed a lawsuit alleging they regularly worked over 40 hours per week and were owed overtime pay.

    10. Open door policy

    A simple way to avoid employment-related problems is open and honest communication. Employees should feel comfortable approaching their employer to discuss employment-related issues. If managers truly have “open doors” to employees, many potential issues can be identified early and rectified before a true problem develops.

    Example: A manager with a volatile personality rarely interacted with his staff. He instructed them to only interact with him by email and not to interrupt him in person with problems. An employee, diagnosed with cancer, needed accommodations to go to chemotherapy and doctor appointments. Uncomfortable with speaking with her manager, she didn’t inform him of her situation and missed many days of work. He terminated her and she sued for disability discrimination.

    Questions? Comments? Contact Josh Holden at ABA Insurance Services via email at jholden@abais.com or call him at 216-903-4597.

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