How Ohio's Depleted Unemployment Comp Fund Impacts Your Business

Experts claim Ohio’s unemployment compensation fund has not been solvent since the 1970’s.  And, according to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Ohio’s fund is on a trajectory that is simply not sustainable.

Several years ago, Ohio was forced to borrow from a federal trust fund to continue paying jobless benefits to unemployed workers.  Employers were solely responsible for paying the balance of the debt incurred.

Fortunately, GCP supported and secured legislation that allowed the state to pay the federal debt a year ahead of schedule, saving Ohio job creators millions of dollars in 2017.  The fact remains, however, that Ohio’s current unemployment system must be re-structured for it to be viable in future generations. 

GCP continues to strongly urge elected officials to consider our members’ views.  We are focused on strategic advocacy efforts that will improve Ohio’s unemployment compensation system to ensure the unemployed receive the support needed to re-enter the workforce, and that the fund is solvent enough to decrease the need for increased unemployment compensation costs on businesses in the event of a future economic downturn.

If policymakers choose not to act, particularly prior to a recession, employers will pay for it.

To learn more about GCP advocacy and view additional GCP public policy priorities, click here.  


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  • Next up: Implementing Successful Sales Paradigms

    Implementing Successful Sales Paradigms

    When it comes to our business and sales specifically, are there certain paradigms holding us back from success? Here’s how and why to make a shift in our thinking.

    Paradigms can refer to the framework of basic assumptions and ways of thinking we have. Whether they work for us or not, paradigms that we have really bought into can be hard to break out of. However, if you have new information about something, it can change the way you think about and relate to it.

    As children many of us believed in Santa Claus. The paradigm we had about Santa Claus was fun, exciting and enjoyable for everyone during early childhood. Then someone, an older brother, sister or vindictive kid, told us that there was no Santa Claus. At first we didn't want to believe it. We kept hoping and searching for validation that there really was a Santa Claus. But, with the new information we eventually gave up believing in Santa Claus and the way we related to Christmas time changed for us. Unfortunately, some salespeople are still waiting for Santa to come around. They still don't believe that they are responsible for their own success.

    Paradigms can change when you acquire new information that alters your usual framework. It is called a paradigm shift. No doubt at some time in your life, you believed somebody had done something to you. As a result, you got upset—only to find out later that what you thought was true was not so. When you found this out both your paradigms and your resulting behavior changed.

    A salesperson has many paradigms about what selling is and what he or she can do or needs to do to be successful at sales. Some of these are true and some are not.

    Here are some examples of common sales-related paradigms:

    Paradigm No. 1: The customer is always right.

    Paradigm No. 2: I know all there is to know about sales.

    Paradigm No. 3: I must have the best dollars to win.

    Paradigm No. 4: It’s OK if my prospect shops my quote.

    Paradigm No. 5: I must present my products so my prospect can be informed.

    So, what’s the most important thing you can do when you realize one of your relied-upon paradigms isn’t working for you? The key is being willing to explore your paradigms and make paradigm shifts when you are not as successful as you would like to be. Learn new paradigms and practice using affirmations with them in order to really let them sink in and become part of your sales framework.

    How important is it for your entire team to buy into the same effective business-related paradigms? The short answer—very. If members of the same team are going in different directions with their sales tactics and techniques, chances are it is only a matter of time until chaos ensues, productivity decreases and sales goals are left unachieved.

    But this is where sales training comes in. We train in most other areas—medicine, law, accounting and so on—why not in sales and sales management? Arranging for formal sales training for your team—and yourself—can help everyone to buy into the same, successful sales strategies

    Tom Scully is sales consultant and owner of a Sandler Training franchise in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

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  • Next up: Instagram Marketing: 3 Tips to Get Started

    Instagram Marketing: 3 Tips to Get Started

    Are you using Instagram to promote your business? Generally speaking, if your target audience members are younger than 50, female and living in urban or suburban areas – Instagram’s primary user group – you should be. With the introduction of some new tools for businesses, Instagram has significantly increased its value as a marketing channel.

    Are you using Instagram to promote your business? Generally speaking, if your target audience members are younger than 50, female and living in urban or suburban areas – Instagram’s primary user group – you should be.
     
    With the introduction of some new tools for businesses, Instagram has significantly increased its value as a marketing channel. Business accounts on Instagram can now track when their audience is most active on the platform, see the demographic breakdown of their followers, and measure the reach, impressions and engagement around each post. Instagram also now allows mobile ad creation, allowing business accounts to easily promote well-performing posts as ads. Instagram created an easy-to-follow video detailing the perks of having a business account.

    If you think Instagram is a good fit, you should start thinking about how to incorporate it into your marketing mix. Here’s three ways to go about doing just that.

    1. Set up a business Instagram account. If you already have an account for your business, but haven’t designated it as a business account, it’s easy to switch. 

    Having a business Instagram account allows you to see insights from your audience, such as when your followers are the most active and how many users view your Instagram profile.

    2. Before you post, have a strategy in place. Instagram is a visual social network, so users expect—and want—to see posts that are aesthetically pleasing. In other words, the prettier, the better. Also, remember use hashtags to help Instagram users find you. When writing your hashtags, think about terms your target audience might search for. If you’re targeting people in the Greater Cleveland area, using #cleveland, #clevelandgram and #thisiscle is always a good idea, for example.

    3. Use Instagram stories. Instagram recently introduced stories  (similar to those found on Snapchat), which allow you to string together a series of photos and videos rather than limit yourself to a single post at a time. Check out this post from SocialMediaToday for examples of how brands are using stories to further engage their audience.

    And for a more detailed how-to approach to creating Instagram stories, check out CNET’s guide

    Want more social media marketing advice? Visit our hub for all things social to read more social best practices articles like this one.




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  • Next up: Intellectual Property for Tech Firms Part 1

    Intellectual Property for Tech Firms Part 1

    Dan McMullen, partner with Calfee, Halter, joins us for a three-part podcast session offering guidance for tech fimrs looking to understand intellectual property  implement such a program and to enhance the value of their company.

    Dan McMullen, partner with Calfee, Halter, joins us for a three-part podcast session offering guidance for tech fimrs looking to understand intellectual property  implement such a program and to enhance the value of their company.

    This is part 1 of the series.

    Listen here.

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  • Next up: Intellectual Property for Tech Firms Part 3

    Intellectual Property for Tech Firms Part 3

    This is Part 3 of our IP series with Calfee Halter partner Dan McMullen.  Dan shares expertise and guidance reviewing the intricacies of intellectual property for technology firms and outlines strategies and best practices for a firm to manage their IP.

    This is Part 3 of our IP series with Calfee Halter partner Dan McMullen.  Dan shares expertise and guidance reviewing the intricacies of intellectual property for technology firms and outlines strategies and best practices for a firm to manage their IP.

    Listen here.

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  • Next up: Intellectual Property Legislation and Supreme Court Cases

    Intellectual Property Legislation and Supreme Court Cases

    NEOSA met with John Cipolla, partner with Calfee Halter, back in early December 2009 to discuss current legislation affecting the future of intellectual property as well as upcoming Supreme Court cases with the potential for significant impact.

    NEOSA met with John Cipolla, partner with Calfee Halter, back in early December 2009 to discuss current legislation affecting the future of intellectual property as well as upcoming Supreme Court cases with the potential for significant impact.

    Listen here.


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