Use Video to Amplify Your Marketing and Drive Results

Using video to promote your business can really kick your marketing up a notch. Read on for tips to getting started, with a specific focus on using social media’s live video components.

Video is a popular way to connect with people and it’s a tactic that’s here to stay. John Sammon, CEO of Sixth City Marketing, presented a recent WebEd Series Webinar focusing on how to use video to enhance your business’ marketing strategy and boost your bottom line. (Scroll to the bottom of this article to view the webinar in its entirety.)

Video can be effectively used to:

  • Put a face to your business;
  • make a personal connection with your pitch;
  • showcase your company’s culture;
  • broadcast what you’re up to at a live event (conference, etc);
  • differentiate your company; and
  • show off a product or service in detail—go live with it and do a walk thru of it.

Creating a more formal video and purchasing the necessary equipment can be costly. Sammon recommends that if you’re just beginning to dip your toe in the world of videos, start on your social sites.

Facebook: When most people think of live video options they think of Facebook. And with good reason—Facebook algorithms reward you for using live video by pushing them to the top of newsfeeds. Live videos can drive ten times more comments and shares because of the connection between users.

YouTube: The live components are easy to navigate on YouTube, which is the second-highest used search engine.

LinkedIn: LinkedIn Live is available only in Beta testing currently but is expected to corner the market on professional working life connections.

Here are some live video tips you can use as you start out:

Live video tip No. 1: It doesn’t have to be perfect. While it’s true that live video cannot be edited, your audience is aware of that and understands that your videos won’t be flawless.

Live video tip No. 2: Tell all your friends. Especially as you’re just starting out and looking to build your audience, alert your friends when you’re going live so you know you have people tuning in. Have them type in some questions to give you the opportunity to interact with your viewers.

Live video tip No. 3: Keep it short and sweet. Video on social sites should be brief segments so that you keep the attention of your audience, which tends to have a short attention span.

Live video tip No. 4: But don’t be afraid to go a little longer when appropriate. If you’re showing off a new product or service, you might want to really go into detail to hook your audience. Don’t worry as much about brevity in these cases.

Live video tip No. 5: Provide value. Release a product, make a big announcement—make sure you’re offering insight or something else of value to your viewers.

Live video tip No. 6: Show off your credibility. Feature a regular industry news wrap up, talk about what you’re up to at a conference or speaking engagement, or show your audience what’s going on at an event you’re attending. Steps like this can show you’re committed to being proactive in the industry, lead you to be identified as an industry expert and help build your credibility.

Live video tip No. 7: Watch the metrics. The great thing about video is you can get statistics on how much it’s viewed, when people drop off, etc. Keep an eye on these numbers and use it to drive your decisions on what kind of content, length of videos, day and time, frequency and other important elements.

Once you are done with your live video, you need to continue marketing it. Here are some things to consider as you’re doing that:

Market it tip No. 1: Reuse the video. You made a live video on Facebook and now it’s living on your timeline. From there you can export it and embed it on your homepage, or wherever you want to feature it.

Market it tip No. 2: Optimize the video. Make sure the title and description of the video contain keywords that will make it easily searchable.

Market it tip No. 3: Hashtag and link it. Include hashtags that are recognizable for your business and industry. And also make sure you include in the description a link back to your website.

Follow other companies making live videos and check out what they do—or just jump right in and start playing around with it. As you do more video, you’ll become more comfortable with doing video, and you’ll learn what works and what doesn’t.


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  • Next up: Using Pokémon Go to drive customers to your local business

    Using Pokémon Go to drive customers to your local business

    By now you’ve heard about Pokémon Go, the mobile phone game that’s become a pop culture sensation. But whether you’re spending your time chasing Pikachu or not, brick-and-mortar owners should be aware of how to use Pokémon Go to attract customers.

    By now you’ve heard about Pokémon Go, the mobile phone game that’s become a pop culture sensation. But whether you’re spending your time chasing Pikachu or not, brick-and-mortar owners should be aware of how to use Pokémon Go to attract customers.

    The game works by integrating a player’s actual location and surroundings into the gaming environment. I’m not going to teach you how to play here because, let’s face it—that’s not why you’re reading this. So let’s get to the good stuff—how do you use the game to attract people to your business?

    A central aspect of Pokémon Go game play are PokeStops and Gyms. Players come to PokeStops to collect items and go to Gyms to battle their Pokemon against those of other players. Why is this important? Well, if your business is located at or near a PokeStop or Gym [TS1] (you might have to ask a Pokémon Go player or download the game yourself to find out), you can leverage that to get Pokémon Go players to drive foot traffic to your location. Here’s how:

    If your business is a PokeStop:

    Plan to set a lure (an item available in Pokémon Go that draws more than the normal number of Pokémon to a PokeStop for a period of 30 minutes) at your PokeStop during a set time of day—and promote that you’re doing so. Let players know via Facebook, Twitter, a big sign in your front window—anything—that they can come of your location and catch a plethora of Pokémon while the lure is active.

    If your business is a Pokémon Gym (or near a Gym):

    Offer a promotion to Pokémon Go players: when they battle at the Gym and win, or they belong to the team (Mystic, Valor or Instinct) that holds the Gym, they get a free item or a discount on their bill. This way, players will want to come and stay at your location while they battle their Pokémon against other players.

    If your business is not already located at or near a PokeStop or Gym, don’t despair! You can place a request that the game adds a location near you. iDigitalTimes has details on this process.

    Want to learn more? Here are more resources to help you use Pokémon Go to promote your business:

    Special thanks to my colleague and fellow Pokémon Go player Paul Marnecheck for providing insight and the photo for this post! pmarnecheck@gcpartnership.com 

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  • Next up: Using Social Media to Learn from Your Customers

    Using Social Media to Learn from Your Customers

    As a small business owner, you probably don’t have a big market research budget. But you probably do have social media accounts. Here are five ways you can use those social channels to listen to what your customers are saying and improve your business and marketing.

    How often does your business take the time to have a two-way conversation with your customers on social media? 

    Social Media is not only a wonderful tool to promote your business to its clients, but it can also help you learn from your customers. In today's world, digital marketing is now a two-way conversation. Consumers have been trained to share their opinions, whether it be through a Facebook post or a product review, and it's up to brands to facilitate a response.Today’s small business owners don’t have big market research budgets, so they have to be creative. Social media can be an effective tool to gather information from your audience and apply them to your business.

    Prompting conversations with your customers can give you some insight into their thoughts, help you improve your business and marketing, and make them feel closer to your brand.

    How can you use social media to learn from your customers? Here are a few simple ways.

    1. Just ask. So often, business owners create products and provide services without ever speaking to their customers.  A simple social media post directly asking them for their thoughts can help you improve your offerings. Customers are willing to and enjoy sharing their thoughts.  It also makes them feel important. Be sure to experiment with Facebook and Instagram paid posts to reach more of your customers and even reach potential new customers.  Having a variety of opinions from current and future customers can help you compare results.

    2.  Launch a contest. Contests are a great way to get customers to share their opinions and thoughts. A small gift certificate to your store or restaurant or the chance to win some free swag is enough to get them to speak up. Make sure to follow Facebook's and Instagram's contest rules before going live with your contest.

    3.  Test your ideas with them. Put your idea out there and let them react. Social media engagement can be a powerful measurement tool. If you get negative reactions, it might be time to go back to the drawing board. Use the Facebook reaction buttons to understand their sentiment and ask them to comment below so you can learn more about their response. On Instagram, leverage emojis and comments to help understand their response.

    4. Reward them for their ideas. Make sure they know that you appreciate their thoughts. For example, if you're asking customers about potential new menu items for your restaurant, think about naming the menu item after the customer who suggested it. Asking too much from your customers and not acknowledging their input puts you at risk for being called greedy or inconsiderate!

    5. Make the change. Take what you learn and put it into action. Customers will expect to see change if you ask about change. They'll be closely watching to see if their opinions get folded into your new business model, product or service. Be sure to call out your customers' help when you announce the chance to demonstrate your appreciation!

    The more you engage your customers in your business decisions, the better you can market to them. Social media is a conversational tool that can help you learn more about your target audience. Are you ready to innovate? Your social media followers are ready to help!

    Annie Pryatel is the owner of AMP Brand Studios. Learn more about how AMP is helping small businesses succeed by clicking here. 

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  • Next up: Vote ‘Yes’ on Issue 32

    Vote ‘Yes’ on Issue 32

    During this election season, Clevelanders understand just how crucial the passage of Issue 32 is to the future of our region. If Issue 32 does not win approval from the voters the Cleveland Police Department, for example, recently cited that it will not be able to hire the officers the City needs.  Cleveland is faced with a budget deficit going into 2017 and if the gap is not filled, Clevelanders will be forced to suffer through the consequences.

    During this election season, Clevelanders understand just how crucial the passage of Issue 32 is to the future of our region. If Issue 32 does not win approval from the voters the Cleveland Police Department, for example, recently cited that it will not be able to hire the officers the City needs.  Cleveland is faced with a budget deficit going into 2017 and if the gap is not filled, Clevelanders will be forced to suffer through the consequences.

    GCP business leaders became convinced of the importance of Issue 32 and formally supported the proposal because it would give our City the ability to enhance services, grow and develop our neighborhoods, and it will lessen the impact of other revenue cuts recently imposed on Cleveland.

    Mayor Frank Jackson’s proposed 0.5% income tax increase (Issue 32) would be Cleveland’s first income tax increase since 1981 and it would:

    •    Eliminate city zoning codes that impede development and business growth.

    •    Improve trash collection, fix potholes, and enhance street sweeping.

    •    Aid in the inspection of buildings and homes with lead poisoning and the demolition of vacant dwellings.

    •    Allow the hiring of 120 Cleveland police department positions over the next four years.

    •    Enable the hiring of five Cleveland fire department personnel, 60 paramedics, and eight dispatchers.

    •    Improve security and programming at recreation centers for Cleveland’s youth.

    •    Support Cleveland’s seniors by increasing safety programming they can utilize at home.

    •    Allow mowing of vacant lots and clean-up illegal dumping of trash.

    •    Better coordinate initiatives that will curb and deter crime.

    “The Greater Cleveland Partnership does not take tax increases lightly,” said Joe Roman President and CEO of the GCP. “Our support of this issue comes after lengthy review and analysis. We believe this issue will help to further energize Cleveland’s renaissance and will offer multiple benefits to people who live and/or work in the city, as well as those who visit. It will make Cleveland an even better city.”
    City leaders have a strong track record managing the City budget – especially through the challenges of the late 2000s. The additional revenue (estimated at roughly $80 million annually) will ensure Cleveland remains structurally balanced and improves services desperately in need of additional resources—especially for public safety.

    Improve safety in Cleveland.  Keep services in Cleveland.  Vote “Yes” on Issue 32.

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  • Next up: Walking with Giants: Meet Your Match

    Walking with Giants: Meet Your Match

    Striking a partnership with a larger firm can be an ideal way to not only increase the amount of volume your small business does, but also give it more visibility in your marketplace as well. But what’s the best way to find these kind of partnerships?

    Striking a partnership with a larger firm can be an ideal way to not only increase the amount of volume your small business does, but also give it more visibility in your marketplace as well. But what’s the best way to find these kind of partnerships? 

    One good way to meet your ideal match is through COSE’s Cleveland B2B Matchmaker. This unique small business contracting event will present a great opportunity for small businesses to gain access to buyers that represent millions of dollars in purchasing. The goal of the event is to create future contract opportunities for small businesses through one-on-one sessions between buyers and sellers. Attendees will also have the opportunity to network with peers and learn how they can grow their small business. 

    Learn more about the Matchmaker here

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  • Next up: Walking with Giants: How to Partner with a Large Company

    Walking with Giants: How to Partner with a Large Company

    From Day One, Joshua Holmes had big dreams for his small business. “My background was never in building small websites—it was in much larger enterprise solutions for hospitals and e-commerce,” Holmes relates. Problem was, there just aren’t a whole lot of big hitters  in Medina, where his 12-person company is based. 

    From Day One, Joshua Holmes had big dreams for his small business.

    “My background was never in building small websites—it was in much larger enterprise solutions for hospitals and e-commerce,” Holmes relates. Problem was, there just aren’t a whole lot of big hitters  in Medina, where his 12-person company is based.

    At first, he did pretty much all types of Web-related work, but he kept his eye on the big leagues, and his business finally built up a rapport and symbiotic partnership with Miami, Florida-based software firm, dotCMS, that was looking for a developer like Ethode to implement its program.

    Holmes learned about dotCMS because he was looking for a platform built in Java (which is faster and more sophisticated than Word Press, from a developer standpoint). He came across dotCMS, which had the features he wanted. When he got to know the firm—which was rolling out its product to marketers who needed help with implementation—both parties discovered a synergy.

    Holmes didn’t know dotCMS, and it’s not like the relationship bloomed overnight. But Holmes took a chance, vetted the firm and dedicated time to learning their product and using it himself.  The more they got to know each other, they realized they had a lot in common. “We came from similar backgrounds,” he says.

    Today, when dotCMS sells its product to a customer, Ethode almost always installs it. And when a customer is considering dotCMS, Ethode often helps close the deal because its third-party opinion makes an impact.

    “Our business doesn’t come from constantly trying to find the next customer,” Holmes says of partnerships like dotCMS and how this opens the sales door. “They depend on us to install a product to make their customers happy, and most of their customers can’t do it themselves.”

    So you’re ready to go big-game hunting? Great! Before you start that hunt, though, read what our experts have to say about their own experiences and how it can jumpstart your efforts.? That means getting this business involves more than just asking for it. Allow our experts to explain.

    What are you trying to do?

    If you’re thinking about a partnership with a big business, the first thing you need to do is: Stop! Christian Silveira, director of sales and mass market operations at OnDemand Energy Solutions, which, like Ethode, has also taken the big-business plunge.

    You first have to figure out if it makes sense for your business. “What is your scope? It’s not necessarily a good business practice for every company, depending on the verticals or services they provide,” he points out.

    Differentiating commodities

    OK, So, you’ve decided it makes sense for you. Great! So, now what? (Hint: It has to do with standing out from the crowd!)

    Energy is a commodity, but OnDemand’s services are far from it. Acting as a consultant is how the firm differentiates itself from competitors. A conversation about the price of power shifts to business strategy—and that’s when large clients listen.

    “The conversation changes from savings to risk mitigation and that is typically exciting for our big clients,” says Christian Silveira, director of sales and mass market operations at OnDemand Energy Solutions, which, like Ethode, has also taken the big-business plunge.

    “When buying a very volatile commodity we discuss the various ways to manage risk. Negotiating favorable contract language for our clients, hedging, or layering energy purchase over time, we believe, is a more prudent way to buy power. After all, buying a commodity is a financial transaction,” says Silveria. “This message resonates with them.”

    Winning face time

    For Holmes, the key to securing large clients has been physically meeting decision makers and contacts who can point him to key personnel in large organizations.

    Of course, that’s easier said than done. But Holmes has found typical lead generation tactics many Web businesses use are not as effective—such as pay-per-click, search engine optimization and traditional advertising.

    “In this day and age, everyone thinks it’s all about electronic ads, but at the end of the day there are a lot of people who say great things but wind up doing a terrible job,” he says. “So, there is fear around hiring IT companies. People are always skeptical of you.”

    Networking in the community and actually meeting prospects makes all the difference. “You have to find them and shake their hands—and once they realize what you know, they recognize you are unique,” Holmes says.

    Show your value

    This seems like a simple question to ask, but what can you really do for a big client? If you’ll help grow their revenues, how? If you’ll mitigate risk for them in some capacity, how? If you’ll expand their footprint or product offerings—how? Be prepared to explain how you can help, and back that up with examples.

    “An anology I like to give when talking with large clients is, ‘Do you file your corporate tax returns yourself?’” Silveira says. Of course, they say no. “Did you hire the cheapest CPA, or the best that provides the most value?”

    Getting prospects to think about value and recognize their buying an expertise can be a game-changer. “The main thing we push here is question-based consulting,” Silveira adds. In other words, he doesn’t want to sit in a boardroom and spend an hour delivering a pitch. He wants prospects to toss him hard-ball questions so he can prove OnDemand’s expertise.

    Investing in growth

    By reinvesting profits into the business, Holmes has grown his firm to the scale where he can service large corporate customers. He knew from the beginning this “enterprise” demographic was his target audience, so he aligned his business strategy accordingly.

    That includes plants to build the first data center in Medina County in 2017, and possibly opening another U.S. location out of state.

    Scaling up

    If you’re going to service the big players, you better be prepared with the resources and manpower (if required) to fulfill your obligations. Big business can mean big workload. For Ethode, that meant scaling up with independent contractors at first so Holmes could service customers’ needs as a constant point of contact (and salesperson).

    Once he grew the business, by year three, Holmes brought on full-time employees. By the end of 2016, he expects to employ 20 people, growing the staff by up to eight employees. “The Catch-22 of contractors is you don’t own them,” Holmes quips. “You can’t dictate their full-time schedules, otherwise they are not considered contractors by law.”      

    Dropping names

    Holmes leveraged his background building corporate enterprise software systems when talking with large prospects about his small business. “I name dropped a little,” he says, relating that he worked on a “massive” project for Skyy Vodka and subsidiaries. “The customer is buying you. They want to know that you know what you are doing, so I said, ‘This is my background. This is what I’ve done.’”

    “I’m a small guy and I fish in a big pond,” Holmes says. “But if you have some background working with big business, that can alleviate their fears.”

    Big business wins

    Following the tips above can pay off in a big way, as Holmes and Silveira can attest.

    Through its partnership with dotCMS and others, Ethode works all over the country. This means Holmes gains exposure to a range of clients in his “sweet spot.” Ethode has implemented projects for companies such as Roto-Rooter, The Cheesecake Factory, Johnsonville, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital—and locally, The University of Akron and Oberlin College.

    “I knew I wanted to immediately grow the company,” Holmes says of the business that got its start in 2010. “It made sense for me to reach out to those two industries (healthcare and e-commerce) and network with people I knew already.”

    It’s been a worthwhile venture also for OnDemand, where large customers comprise approximately 20% of the customer base. And 80% of the energy load under contract comes from that base. “It’s the old 80/20 rule,” Silveira says.

    Overall, OnDemand manages electricty supply requirements for more than 5,000 clients with more than 27,000 meters, a total energy load under contract exceeding 15 billion kilowatt hours. That’s big.

    A “legacy book” of ongoing relationships prior to launching OnDemand has been key to getting in the door with big companies. Like Ethode, OnDemand took a good look at “who do you know” and honed in on those clients. Previously, the firm was part a wholly owned subsidiary of Duquesne Light in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania.

    OnDemand’s client base runs the gamut, and most are small businesses. But the firm can really stretch its consulting muscles when working with large firms that hire OnDemand as an extension of their energy management teams. They look at OnDemand as the CPA or attorney—a professional they need on hand to navigate energy procurement contract language.  

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