Use Personality Assessments to Make the Right Hire

Finding and retaining quality talent continues to be a top priority for organizations, regardless of size or industry. Properly motivated people, aligned with a company’s values and strategy, are crucial to achieving organizational excellence.

Finding and retaining quality talent continues to be a top priority for organizations, regardless of size or industry. Properly motivated people, aligned with a company’s values and strategy, are crucial to achieving organizational excellence.

But finding the “right” person, takes an incredible amount of time, effort and money. The stakes are high: The cost of a bad hire is staggering. However, the value of an engaged associate is priceless.

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    Unfortunately, there’s no sure-fire way to guarantee success of a new hire. However, there are opportunities to gather and utilize more self-reported data during the interview process to lower the risk and increase the likelihood of success.

    Personality Assessment

    One strategy is to utilize a valid personality assessment. While there are many off-the-shelf options available, some of the most commonly known assessments include Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®), the DiSC® and Hogan Personality Inventory (HPI) ® Each of these assessments are intended to provide a closer look at a candidate’s personality within the context of ideal work performance.

    The best organizations are using personality assessment to take a more proactive approach to hiring and development. Typically, personality assessment becomes part of the hiring process. Doing so offers a more long-term and calculated approach to an organization’s most valuable resource: human capital. Simply put: any hiring manager can use a quick, inexpensive personality assessment.

    Although there are many benefits of the powerful selection and development tools available, it’s important to question how tests are created, as well understand the accompanying methodology used to validate them. The reality is, there are many assessments available today that did not exist years ago. In fact, a keyword search on “personality assessments” results in all sorts of options ranging from anger management, assertiveness, adventurousness, arguing style, and on and on. This is where engaging a consultant, trained in both administering and evaluating assessment results, provides a greater return on investment and can help you make sense of the tests and what their scores mean.

    Provided there has been care placed into the design and use of an assessment within a work setting, organizations are well positioned to make a strong business case for the use of objective tests—specifically, those created with a degree of rigor helping them to be consistent, reliable, and legally defensible. Today’s leading companies are making use of assessment data to attract top talent and develop winning, profitable cultures.

    Mark Kogelnik is part of the leadership team at human resources management firm Watterson & Associates. To learn more about how Watterson & Associates can help your organization analyze the talents and personalities of potential recruits and, as closely as possible, match their talents to the position and your business, please contact us at 440.247.7976 or email mkogelnik@wattersonassociates.com.

     

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    Next up: Wellness at Work: How to Get Started
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  • Wellness at Work: How to Get Started

    Wellness programs can increase the engagement level of your staff, which can help your bottom line.


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    Next up: What Does the Healthcare Talk Mean for You?
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  • What Does the Healthcare Talk Mean for You?

    Current health care "talk" still doesn't mean anything to you and your current plan, at least for the moment.

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    With all the activity on health care legislation this week, we've received quite a few calls asking about what it means for small business owners.  The answer in a word (or two) is "Nothing (yet)."

    We keep pretty close tabs on what's going on here and COSE members and staff were actually in DC last week to talk about health care and tax reform with our elected officials.  In engaging with staffers of members that are involved in the discussions, it was apparent that even they and their bosses were being kept in the dark on all the details.

    We can't tell you what the prospects of passage are this week, but even if something passes, it will need to be reconciled with the House Bill and that won't be a pretty process.

    It's pretty likely that effective dates for all of the changes that could be made won't take effect for years -- and like the implementation of the ACA it could all change in the process of implementing whatever passes.

    So, what to do as a small business owner?  As they say, "Keep Calm and Carry On."  If you are in a grandfathered plan, nothing has changed for you.  If you are in a grandmothered or "transitional" plan, those will continue to be available to you through December 2018, allowing you to stay where you are without being disrupted by the nonsense.  You may recall those have now been extended three times since the implementation of ACA in 2014.  If you are on the individual exchange--with or without a subsidy--you may be the most impacted by the changes that have happened and that are possible with new legislation.  But, again, nothing has happened yet and any action will likely be phased in over time.

    One option, no matter what your situation, is to look at experienced based options like COSE's Health and Wellness Trust (aka COSE MEWA).  There are other self-insured MEWAs like the COSE MEWA out there as well.  These plans get back to underwriting your real experience, avoid some of the costs and rules of the ACA and are viable options -- especially if you have average to decent medical experience.  The plan has grown a lot since we introduced it late last year and is a great option if you are looking for something stable that isn't as sensitive to the daily conversation of congress.  You can learn more at COSEMEWA.ORG....and if you have specific questions, feel free to get in touch directly...it's a big part of what we do every day for you and we are happy to answer your questions.

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    Next up: What to Know About New OSHA Rules
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  • What to Know About New OSHA Rules

    Hopefully, you heard the news OSHA issued a final rule on Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Fall Protection Systems that was effective Jan. 17, 2017. The final rule includes revised and new information that addresses everything from fixed ladders and fall protection systems to training and design requirements.

    Hopefully, you heard the news OSHA issued a final rule on Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Fall Protection Systems that was effective Jan. 17, 2017. The final rule includes revised and new information that addresses everything from fixed ladders and fall protection systems to training and design requirements. The supporting materials in the rule also references more than a dozen industry standards, from Safety Requirements for Workplace Walking/Working Surfaces and Their Access to Safety Requirements for Personal Fall Arrest Systems. If an organization has fall-related hazards and exposures it would be prudent to have a fall protection management program in effect. The rule, by itself, doesn't require all employers to have a written fall protection program, unless doing residential roofing (non-construction) where use of fall protection is infeasible. It is also important to note the revised rule gives employers flexibility to use personal fall protection systems (personal fall arrest, travel restraint, and work positioning systems) in lieu of guardrail systems. This addresses performance-related practices, so an assessment would be important to utilize and is consistent with existing requirements for written hazard assessments for selection of necessary PPE.

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    Under new rules, employers must set up the workplace to prevent employees from falling off overhead platforms, elevated work stations or into holes in the floor and walls. Employers will also have to inspect working and walking surfaces for conditions that could create hazards, including snow, ice, water, blood, uneven flooring, and exercise good housekeeping to identify and correct conditions such as protruding objects or cables across walkways that could trip or otherwise injure workers.  

    As a baseline, OSHA expects employers to: 

    • Inspect and provide working conditions that are free of known fall dangers.
    • Keep floors in work areas in a clean and, so far as possible, a dry condition.
    • Select and provide needed personal protective equipment at no cost to workers.
    • Utilize guardrail or other effective barrier systems to engineer out fall hazards where possible, but otherwise effectively use Personal Fall Arrest Systems (PFAs), train workers on use of PPE, maintain and inspect equipment.
    • Provide appropriate ladders or other aerial work platforms and scissor lifts to allow workers to safely access work areas (and train them on the use of this equipment).
    • Train workers generally about fall hazards and PPE use in a language they can understand

    Here are 10 specific items that changed in the standard.

    1)    Training required for exposed workers or equipment users by May 2017.  This includes general for exposure, roof, equipment, and key individuals (authorized, competent, and qualified persons).

    2)    Equipment requirements included changes to the test weights of snap hooks and carabineers, and requirements for self-retractable lanyards, including deceleration distances.

    3)    Changed safe distance to roof edges as well as defining temporary and infrequent tasks on roofs.

    4)    Modified ladders and stairs requirements starting in 2018 and required safety systems on all ladders by 2036. This includes requirements for spiral stairs and ships ladders.

    5)    Guardrails are now aligned with construction industry and codified 19 inch opening requirements.

    6)    Requires written certification of the workplace assessment to determine if hazards are present.

    7)    Rope descent systems must comply with 1910.27(b)(1)(i).

    8)    Documentation requirements include assessments, training, anchors, and walking working surface load rating.

    9)    Updated definitions of competent and qualified person in subpart D and I. 

    10) Important compliance dates for employee training May 17, 2017, certification of anchorages on Nov. 20, 2017, existing fixed ladders need cage well, ladder safety system or PFAs Nov. 19, 2018, new ladders with ladder safety system by Nov. 19, 2018, and all fixed ladders must be equipped with a ladder safety system or PFAS by Nov. 18, 2016.

    Employers should ensure compliance, safety, and risk management in all tasks.  With this in mind, OSHA estimates these changes will prevent 29 fatalities and 5,842 lost-workday injuries every year.  

    OSHA aligned fall protection requirements for general industry with those for construction, easing compliance for employers who perform both types of activities. For example, the final rule replaces the outdated general industry scaffold standards with a requirement that employers comply with OSHA's construction scaffold standards.  OSHA has created a frequently asked questions guide for the standard.

    We hope this article is helpful and feel free to contact us with questions regarding implementation of the standard. 

    Learn more about COSE’s Workers’ Compensation program

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    Next up: What To Know When You Exit Your Business
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  • What To Know When You Exit Your Business

    If you're a business owner, you know there is going to come a day when you will step away from your business. During COSE's recent Small Business Convention, James Aussem, a shareholder at the law firm of Cavitch, Familio & Durkin, laid out three things business owners should know before they exit their business.

    If you're a business owner, you know there is going to come a day when you will step away from your business. At COSE's recent Small Business Convention, James Aussem, a shareholder at the law firm of Cavitch, Familio & Durkin, laid out three things business owners should know before they exit their business.  

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    1. Anticipate your needs

    Retirement can be costly. To keep up with your current lifestyle, you're going to have to know how much you're going to need in terms of such things as living expenses, health insurance, and more. If you're selling your company, you're going to need to make sure you get enough from the sale to help provide a comfortable retirement.

    2. Business needs

    It's important to understand what the needs of the business are. Some considerations to keep in mind are:

    • capital requirements;
    • taxes; and
    • expansion of the successor generation's income. 

    3. The next generation

    If the owner intends to sell to the next generation, he or she needs to understand several things first. For example, there are tax risks involved with bargain transactions between family members. The Internal Revenue Service presumes all transactions among related parties have a gift element, for example.

    Want to know more about exit strategies? Keep an eye out in January for COSE's refreshed magazine for small business owners which will include an in-depth feature on what entrepreneurs need to know when it comes to exit strategies. 

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    Next up: What You Learn from A Restaurant that Hires Only the Formerly Incarcerated
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  • What You Learn from A Restaurant that Hires Only the Formerly Incarcerated

    Brandon Chrostowski knows a thing or two about what it means to hire for potential.

    Brandon Chrostowski knows a thing or two about what it means to hire for potential.

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    The founder and CEO of EDWINS Leadership & Restaurant Institute in Cleveland started EDWINS, a restaurant staffed entirely by people who spent time incarcerated. At any given time, there are 40 people enrolled in the program with a new class beginning and ending every two months. The restaurant provides job training, life training and perhaps most importantly, a second chance to its staff. 

    “There’s so much potential in this town,” Chrostowski says. “There’s so much depth. There are so many people willing to work. There’s just no system in place to facilitate this.”

    EDWINS provides such a system for some, though with every one of his employees having previously been imprisoned, he acknowledges it’s important that he keep a keen eye for hiring. So, what are some of the key things he is looking for?

    “Someone who wants it,” he says. “A desire.”

    Chrostowski continues: “I run them through the mill. It’s a test to see who has a winning attitude. I want to see if in the first three weeks they’re not getting up early; they’re not improving. They have to show improvement. We can train anyone with a ‘I can, I will’ attitude.”

    Needless to say, Chrostowski is a big believer in second chances. “If you believe in human will and fair and equal opportunities for everyone and put all of that together, it should all come together. It’s obvious it should,” he says.

    Given his experience at EDWINS, what’s Chrostowski’s advice to his fellow entrepreneurs? Be vigilant about everything that is going on in your business and be aggressive about getting things taken care of.

    “When you see a problem, fix a problem,” he advises. “There’s no reason why you should wait or the problem should wait. If you don’t address it, you’ll have a bigger one.”

    In addition to the Feb. 7 event, learn about additional COSE events that will provide you with the resources you need to grow your business.

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