Tech Growth CEO Perspectives

All businesses go through various stages, such as start-up – growth – maturity. Tech companies are no different, albeit with a few nuances. But growing a tech company is nonetheless challenging: adding and integrating talent, staying on top of rapidly changing trends, finding funding and more. How have your peers, running successful, growing tech companies done it? What are some secrets to successfully growing a tech company in the CLE? 

All businesses go through various stages, such as start-up – growth – maturity. Tech companies are no different, albeit with a few nuances. But growing a tech company is nonetheless challenging: adding and integrating talent, staying on top of rapidly changing trends, finding funding and more. How have your peers, running successful, growing tech companies done it? What are some secrets to successfully growing a tech company in the CLE? 

Sharing their insights are: 

  • Ron Crowl, CEO - FeneTech. FeneTech, offers an ERP solution specifically targeted to the glass making industry. Winner of NEOSA’s Best Emerging Company award in 2011, the company expanded internationally several years ago and has dramatically grown sales in the past several years. 
  • Mark Woodka, CEO – OnShift. OnShift offers scheduling and staff management software for the healthcare industry. Winner of Best Emerging Company in 2010, and Best Software Product Finalist in 2012, the company has steadily grown sales and attracted significant capital investment.

Listen here.


Share
  • Email
  • Next up: Tech Growth CEO Perspectives

    Tech Growth CEO Perspectives

    AJ Hyland, CEO of Hyland Software, and Steve Potash, CEO of OverDrive, share stories from their early days with a fast forward to current challenges for a more mature tech company.

    All businesses go through various stages, such as start-up – growth – maturity. Tech companies are no different, albeit with a few nuances. But growing a tech company is nonetheless challenging: adding and integrating talent, staying on top of rapidly changing trends, finding funding and more. How have your peers, running successful, growing tech companies done it? What are some secrets to successfully growing a tech company in the CLE?

    AJ Hyland, CEO of Hyland Software, and Steve Potash, CEO of OverDrive, share stories from their early days with a fast forward to current challenges for a more mature tech company.

    Listen here.


    Share
  • Email
  • Next up: Tech Growth CEO Perspectives II

    Tech Growth CEO Perspectives II

    All businesses go through various stages, such as start-up – growth – maturity. Tech companies are no different, but with certain, definite nuances. Growing a tech company comes with unique challenges: attracting/retaining talent that’s in short supply, staying on top of rapidly changing trends, funding product development, honing the value proposition and more. 

    All businesses go through various stages, such as start-up – growth – maturity. Tech companies are no different, but with certain, definite nuances. Growing a tech company comes with unique challenges: attracting/retaining talent that’s in short supply, staying on top of rapidly changing trends, funding product development, honing the value proposition and more. 

    How have your peers, running successful, growing tech companies done it? How have they overcome challenges and successfully grown a tech company in the CLE? 

    As President and CEO, Chuck Rotuno has guided OEConnection's success, and respected industry position, since the company's formation in December, 2000. Chuck has taken the company from a single product start-up to a nationally recognized leader of comprehensive e-commerce solutions for the automotive original equipment parts marketplace. 

    Serial entrepreneur Greg Clement has been building and growing successful businesses for more than a decade. Since 2007, Greg has led Realeflow, which creates software designed to assist with real estate investing. Greg has led the organization from product conceptualization and development to making Realeflow the country’s largest SaaS company in that real estate investing niche.

    Listen here.


    Share
  • Email
  • Next up: Tech Growth CEO Perspectives II Q and A

    Tech Growth CEO Perspectives II Q and A

    Question and answer portion from NEOSA's Tech Growth: CEO Perspectives Forum

    Question and answer portion from NEOSA's Tech Growth: CEO Perspectives Forum

    Listen here.


    Share
  • Email
  • Next up: Tech Growth CEO Perspectives Q and A

    Tech Growth CEO Perspectives Q and A

    Here's the Q&A session from the recent NEOSA Forum, Tech Growth:  CEO Perspectives.

    Here's the Q&A session from the recent NEOSA Forum, Tech Growth:  CEO Perspectives.

    Listen here.

    Share
  • Email
  • Next up: The #1 Must-Have Skill For All Marketers & Salespeople

    The #1 Must-Have Skill For All Marketers & Salespeople

    Now that everyone has jumped on the content marketing bandwagon, it’s become harder than ever for companies to get their messages heard. But it can be done! Read on below for insight from Sam Brenner, VP of Marketing at BoxCast, for his take on the most important skill that marketing and sales teams need when looking to earn consumer attention.

    “Content is king.”

    That was the hot phrase at every marketing conference, workshop, and seminar between 2010 and 2015. Everywhere you went all anyone wanted to talk about was content, specifically the creation of a truckload full of it. Write a lot of blog posts. Create a newsletter. Share everything about your business on Facebook. Get a Twitter account and start engaging. Start a podcast. Get a camera and film a bunch of videos. The content game was all about volume.

    Businesses got the message. Volume has been achieved and now we have more content online than any of us know what to do with. We’re up to our eyes in content.

    And therein lies a big challenge for marketers and salespeople today: Our prospective customers are being asked to consume content from every brand in every channel at all hours of the day. And when you combine the high volume of content being produced with attention spans that have shrunk to less than 10 seconds by some accounts, it’s not a good combination for getting your brand to stand out from all the others.

    That’s why I believe focusing your marketing and sales efforts on the art and science behind earning consumer attention and creating contextual conversations is so important for any business today.

    It can be done and it can have significantly positive impact on your business.

    My obsession with consumer attention and how to best communicate with consumers drives everything my team does at BoxCast. During my upcoming Business Growth Boot Camp session on August 29th, Attention & Context—the Two Most Important Words in Marketing, I’ll dig into this thesis and share some of the tactics we’ve used to capture consumer attention and how we’ve used content to create context for our audiences.

    Ahead of the Boot Camp on the 29th, I think it’s important to lay the groundwork. There is one skill that I believe every marketer and salesperson should practice on a daily basis in order to be successful...

    Walk A Mile In Your Customers’ Shoes
    I recently hired someone who now runs our channel marketing efforts. Early on in the interview, she asked me a good question: “What’s the best way for me to be successful in this new role?”

    My answer was quick and simple…

    Empathy.

    With all the challenges I mentioned earlier—tons of content, many different channels, and shorter attention spans—it’s easy for us marketers to forget about our audience and view our activities from their perspective. And that’s the biggest mistake companies are making with their content creation and distribution today. They lack empathy for their end user. Our customers are getting dozens of marketing emails every day and seeing dozens of posts in their feeds. They aren’t always ready to buy and they aren’t always thinking about our products and services. A person is in a different mindset while searching on YouTube than they are while searching on Google than they are searching on Quora; They are looking for different content in LinkedIn than they are when they open their Instagram app. When they’re on Pinterest and then go on Facebook, they have different experiences with different expectations. When they come to our websites, they are looking to educate themselves, not be sold to immediately. Keep all of this in mind with every piece of content you create and ask yourself: “Who is this for and why do they care?”

    The ability to intimately understand and share the feelings of your consumers is crucial in earning their attention, building context, and eventually gaining their trust and business. If you allow empathy to drive your content creation and distribution strategy, your business will shift from trying to constantly get something out of your consumer to bringing unique value to your consumer.

    Boot Camp Takeaways
    I’ll go into much greater detail during my Boot Camp session on August 29th on how to create and distribute content that’s valuable and how to set your content marketing program up for success as we move into 2019.

    If you’re going to attend the Boot Camp, I encourage you to bring your questions. In my opinion, the most valuable section of any talk or workshop like this is the Q&A time. I’ll leave plenty of room for it at the end of my talk. It’s a great opportunity to learn from each other and for all of us to share our successes, challenges, and best practices. I’m looking forward to seeing you on August 29th!

    Part 1 of the Boot Camp will also set the stage for Part 2 on September 26th—How to Build a Marketing Machine from Scratch—where I’ll explain in detail how BoxCast built a marketing and sales machine that took our business from less than $500,000 in annual recurring revenue to the fast-growing, multi-million-dollar company it is today.

    Register for Parts 1 and 2 of this Boot Camp Series to save $10 on your registration. Email Margaret Bajic at mbajic@gcpartnership.com to learn more.

    Share
  • Email