Air Sanitization: Which Option Do I Choose?

Watch GCP's recent webinar about disinfecting air streams.

Prioritizing decisions that improve indoor air quality has never been more important than it is in the age of COVID. Building owners are putting people first.

In a recent webinar, we took a critical look at the various air sanitization technologies and broke them down to better understand what application is right for a building. Placement of these specific systems is extremely important to ensure their effectiveness.

One of GCP’s partner contractors, Air Force One, discussed the benefits of each of these systems to help you make an informed decision for your unique needs.

Watch the webinar recording below:

 

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  • Next up: Back up Power to Create Resiliency and Incentives
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  • Back up Power to Create Resiliency and Incentives

    Watch the GCP Energy Team's recent webinar about finding the right-sized generator for your business and how a demand response program can benefit you.

    GCP's Energy Team recently hosted a discussion about creating resiliency, reliability, redundancy, and return on investment.

    GCP’s demand response partner, CPower and backup generator and monitoring partner, PowerSecure; both market leaders, discussed how you can optimize interior and exterior lighting & controls, HVAC & Mechanical, and Electrical systems, and reduce kWh and your carbon footprint with the right sized generator for your unique needs, and then benefit from participation in a demand response program.

    Watch the recording below:

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  • Next up: Electronic Communications: Employer VS. Employee Privacy Rights
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  • Electronic Communications: Employer VS. Employee Privacy Rights

    To what extent can employers monitor their employees when it comes to electronic communication? It can be confusing but it's important you know your rights.

     

    As a small business owner, it is important that you are knowledgeable about employee rights, even if you only have a few employees. Workplace privacy rights extend to all employees no matter the size of the business. 

    In simple terms, employee privacy rights are basically the rules that limit how extensively an employer can search an employee’s possessions or person; how much they can monitor employees’ actions, speech, or correspondence; and how much an employer can know about their personal lives. By its very nature, social media has increased privacy concerns and potential issues as people post, tweet or otherwise put personal information out into the electronic universe. So as a small business owner it can be confusing regarding what you can and cannot do regarding employee privacy rights. I will provide some general information and guidance, but when in doubt, always check with your attorney. 

    Electronic communication and social media are huge areas of concern when it comes to employee vs. employer rights. As a general rule, employers have the right to search through anything that appears on company computers, social media and the internet. So basically, as an employer you can review e-mails sent and received through your own server, but you cannot access an employee's personal e-mail account through a password that's stored on a work-issued device. It is important to have a policy that explains to employees how you monitor email and computers and that there is no expectation of privacy when using your computers or property.

    RELATED: Do you have these items in your employee handbook?

    The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) provides the following guidance:
    Company policies should not bar activity protected by federal labor law, like the discussion of working conditions or wages amongst workers.
    A worker’s social media comments are generally unprotected if they are minor complaints not related to a group activity with employees.

    Employers also have the right to monitor telephone calls placed to and from their locations, but with limits. The Electronics Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) prohibits employers from monitoring employees' personal phone calls even if the calls were made or received on an employer's property. The Act also requires the employer to disclose the fact that calls are being monitored and makes it a civil liability for employers to read, disclose, delete, or prevent access to an employee's voicemail.

    Employers have the right to monitor their employees by camera, including in a parking structure for both security and employee safety. However, employers are required to notify employees, customers, and all others in the range of the cameras that their property is under video surveillance. Video recordings cannot include audio due to federal wiretap laws. And cameras can only be used in areas where there is a legitimate threat of theft or violence and never in break rooms, bathrooms or locker rooms.

    RELATED: Read more by Tim Dimoff.

    As always, there are some exceptions to all of these rules, especially when electronic communications are involved. Make sure you think about who is setting up your business' social media accounts and make sure that they and you have a clear understanding upfront about who is granted access to those accounts and what rights your employees will have with regard to those accounts.

    President, SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Speaker, Trainer, Corporate Security ExpertTimothy A. Dimoff, CPP, president of SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Inc., is a speaker, trainer and author and a leading authority in high-risk workplace and human resource security and crime issues. He is a Certified Protection Professional; a certified legal expert in corporate security procedures and training; a member of the Ohio and International Narcotic Associations; the Ohio and National Societies for Human Resource Managers; and the American Society for Industrial Security. He holds a B.S. in Sociology, with an emphasis in criminology, from Dennison University. Contact him at info@sacsconsulting.com.

     
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  • Next up: Is it Time to Bring Back Your Workforce?
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  • Is it Time to Bring Back Your Workforce?

    Are you considering bringing your team back into the office? What will a post-COVID workplace look like? Take these guidelines into considerations as you plan your return.

     

    It’s been over a year since the pandemic began and many businesses have experienced shutdowns or have had employees work remotely. As things begin to ease up and more people are being vaccinated, what does that mean for small business? How will your business look and operate going forward? Will you bring employees back or will you continue to have them work remotely? Will your business model look different in the future? What is your new normal?

    While workplaces may look different as we move forward, there are some basics plans and strategies that may help you decide when and how to work in the future, and if you want to attempt to bring back in-person employees, and to determine your timeline.

    Employers and employees may have mixed feelings on coming back to full capacity but it most likely will be a slow process. Many may want to continue the remote work arrangements. According to a Gallup poll, nearly two-thirds of employees who have been working remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic wish to remain remote, while only 35% say they wish to return to the office.

    RELATED: COVID-19 Design Play Book

    The health and safety of the workforce should be your top priority and it must include a moral, ethical and legal concern for all employees and customers. New protocols may include deep cleaning and sanitization, rethinking the layout of the workspace, establishing guidelines for the use of personal protective equipment, and establishing rules governing when employees can return to work after recovering from infection should all be considered and evaluated.

    There are important considerations that you should be thinking about when making a decision to move forward. The most important aspect, and one that is going to be very helpful to you, is to develop a plan that takes the following into consideration:

    • Put people first and include considerations for risk and what controls you need to keep people safe and healthy while also keeping your business continuity and productivity.
    • Determine who actually needs to return to in-person work and who can continue to work remotely.
    • Focus on customers, workforce, and other factors in order to keep everyone safe.
    • Communicate changes and policies to everyone. Make sure all employees and customers know the rules and procedures going forward.
    • Have a plan to mitigate workplace illness. This may include contract tracing, following state and local guidelines, setting expectations, considering legal and operational risks for employees, vendors and customers.
    • Learn to operate under new conditions that may include rethinking how people work, your real estate footprint, new training, new tools, and more.
    • Plan work schedules with people in mind and make an effort to understand your employees’ needs.
    • Reevaluate your performance measures.

    RELATED: Read more by Tim Dimoff.

    Think strategically but be smart when determining what works best for your employees, your customers, and your business.

     

    President, SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Speaker, Trainer, Corporate Security ExpertTimothy A. Dimoff, CPP, president of SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Inc., is a speaker, trainer and author and a leading authority in high-risk workplace and human resource security and crime issues. He is a Certified Protection Professional; a certified legal expert in corporate security procedures and training; a member of the Ohio and International Narcotic Associations; the Ohio and National Societies for Human Resource Managers; and the American Society for Industrial Security. He holds a B.S. in Sociology, with an emphasis in criminology, from Dennison University. Contact him at info@sacsconsulting.com.

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  • Next up: The Power of 5G and the Fourth Industrial Revolution
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  • The Power of 5G and the Fourth Industrial Revolution

    Watch our recent webinar exploring the power of 5G.

    Verizon 5G Ultra Wideband is in the process of being deployed globally, and it's already here in Cleveland, but what exactly is it? Why is it so important?

    In a recent webinar, experts from Verizon discussed everything from the differences between 4G and 5G, as well as some use cases that show the power of 5G for manufacturing, healthcare, and more. We'll also touch on Verizon's local footprint, our corporate social responsibility approach and our investment in Northeast Ohio.

    Watch the recording below:

     
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  • Next up: The State of Latino Entrepreneurship and the Impact of COVID-19 on Latino Businesses
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  • The State of Latino Entrepreneurship and the Impact of COVID-19 on Latino Businesses

    Watch GCP's recent webinar exploring the State of Latino Entrepreneurship and The Impact of Covid-19 on Latino Businesses.

    In a recent GCP webinar, the Equity & Inclusion Division was joined by Marlene Orozco, Lead Research Analyst with the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and CEO of Stratified Insights, a research consulting firm. Ms. Orozco shared research on the State of Latino Entrepreneurship and The Impact of Covid-19 on Latino Businesses.

    The webinar was part of the "But What Does It Mean?" series, devoted to translating research studies and data into meaningful action.

    Watch the recording below:

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