What Makes a Well-Rounded Data Science Team?

We’re continuing our look into what roles you need to fill to create a perfect data science team by explaining the roles filled by the Machine Learning Scientist; Data Engineer; and Engagement Leader.

Creating a data science team requires painstaking precision. It should be multifaceted. Not only should it consist of data scientists, with different specializations and disciplines, but it also requires a strong support system to round it out.

So, who will you have access to on any engagement with Pandata? First, let’s start with a quick review of two positions we discussed in a previous post: The Data Scientist and Analyst.

Data Scientist, aka the “Data Wizard”

A keen problem solver who can frame complex problems, apply advanced statistical techniques to raw data to derive insight and meaning, and communicate key insights to leadership. Skills include: distributed computing, predictive modeling, leadership and interpersonal communication, storytelling and visualizing, math, statistics, and machine learning.

Data Analyst, aka the “Data Detective”

Cleans, massages & organizes data to perform statistical data analysis and provide critical reports. Skills include: spreadsheet tools, database systems, communications and visualizations, math and statistics.

The rest of the team

But it takes more than two people to tango on a data science team. Let’s meet the other members of your company’s data division: the Machine Learning Scientist; Data Engineer; and Engagement Leader.

Machine Learning Scientist, aka the “Data Whisperer”

A specialized data scientist who leverages advanced algorithms and study design to develop next-level predictive models and extract value from complex data. Skills include: distributed computing; data mining; predictive modeling; algorithm development; big data modeling; advanced mathematics; and statistics.

Data Engineer, aka the “Data Pipeline Builder”

Develops, constructs, tests and maintains architectures. Skills include: distributed computing; large-scale database systems; data modeling; data APIs; and data warehousing solutions.

Engagement Leader, aka the “Data Science Team Leader”

Maintains the customer engagement and experience. The liaison between the customer and the technical team. Skills include: project and traffic management; customer service; interpersonal communication; problem-solving, reporting and contracting; as well as database systems; data mining; and predictive modeling.

To learn more about how the well-rounded team at Pandata can help address your data pain points, drop us a line.

Nicole Ponstingle is the Chief Strategy Officer and a Partner at Pandata.


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  • Next up: Wherefore art thou NEOSA?
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  • Wherefore art thou NEOSA?

    We’re pleased to associate it with our own name and this news: we’ve changed our name to OHTech!

    What's in a name? That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet! – William Shakespeare

    That quote can be interpreted a couple of ways: that names don’t matter or that the essence of the object is what’s important. Similar interpretations to be sure.

    But we like the quote and we’re pleased to associate it with our own name and this news: we’ve changed our name to OHTech!

    The details behind the change are probably tedious, but suffice it to say that it was a long, detailed process begun last year and culminating in December.

    We’ve been working on a lot of changes here, at the former NEOSA, changes that include new talent services, business development, statewide connections and more. So as part of that whole process, it made a lot of sense to re-evaluate the brand image and make changes as necessary. Hence: OHTech.

    We issued a press release last week on the change and our friends at Crain's were kind enough to note the story today, online and in print.

    We also announced the new name at our Tech Thursday event on January 29, and as our board chair, Gabe Torok shared in toasting the change: “NEOSA has served us well for the past 16 years, onward OHTech!”

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  • Next up: Why Employee Motivation Matters More in a Small Business
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  • Why Employee Motivation Matters More in a Small Business

    Employee happiness is nothing to laugh at. With the average cost of replacing an employee being as high as it is, it’s important that small business owners provide motivation for their workers to be good, long-term employees.

     

    Small business owners may not have as much time to devote to making sure their employees are happy. They are too busy running the business, developing clients and increasing their revenues. While these are all important to growing and running a small business, it is a mistake not to factor employee happiness and motivation into the mix. The high costs of replacing valued employees mean a small business can really take a hit if they ignore keeping their employees happy and motivated. Small businesses often have fewer employees than large companies, so losing a valued employee or having employees who develop apathy or don’t care is even more costly to them. The average cost of replacing an employee can be as much as twice their base salary, and if they are very valuable, it can be even higher.

    It is very important for small businesses to understand what motivates their employees. Understanding what employees want and ensuring they are happy and productive pays off in many ways and goes a long way to retaining them. As an employer, you can easily find out what your employees want and find a way to give it to them or enable them to earn it. Here are some ideas when it comes to employee happiness.

    Communicate that you care

    Employees should know and feel that you care. This helps foster a mutual respect and motivates them to perform at their best. Begin by using clear communication between management and staff. This will help to create a strong workplace culture. It doesn’t have to be expensive to send a positive message that you care about your employees. Little gestures such as providing coffee or having a holiday party help to communicate that the company cares.

    Make them feel valued

    Don’t hesitate to ask your employees for their opinions and feedback as this helps them feel valued and a part of your company. They can tell you what they need and want. Never make the mistake of assuming all is well when actually negative things may be festering under the surface, ultimately leading to costly employee turnover.  

    Keep things casual

    Allowing employees to go casual can go a long way toward motivation. This can be as simple as your dress code or allowing them to customize their workspace.

    Beef up benefits

    Here are some other considerations that can help keep your employees motivated. Choose and implement the ones that may work for your budget and your company:

    • Health dental and vision insurance
    • Flexible working hours
    • Paid vacation time
    • Flexible work schedules or work from home options
    • Tuition assistance
    • Day Care
    • Fitness center memberships
    • Team bonding events
    • Employee outings
    • Free snacks and coffee

    These are only suggestions but any gestures you can make that help them feel positive about the company and that they are valued will pay you back tenfold in employee retention, employee motivation and on your bottom line.

    Timothy A. Dimoff, CPP, president of SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Inc., is a speaker, trainer and author and a leading authority in high-risk workplace and human resource security and crime issues. He is a Certified Protection Professional; a certified legal expert in corporate security procedures and training; a member of the Ohio and International Narcotic Associations; the Ohio and National Societies for Human Resource Managers; and the American Society for Industrial Security. He holds a B.S. in Sociology, with an emphasis in criminology, from Dennison University. Contact him at info@sacsconsulting.com.

     

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  • Next up: Why Employee Motivation Matters More in a Small Business
  • More in Operations
  • Why Employee Motivation Matters More in a Small Business

    Employee happiness is nothing to laugh at. With the average cost of replacing an employee being as high as it is, it’s important that small business owners provide motivation for their workers to be good, long-term employees.

     

    Small business owners may not have as much time to devote to making sure their employees are happy. They are too busy running the business, developing clients and increasing their revenues. While these are all important to growing and running a small business, it is a mistake not to factor employee happiness and motivation into the mix. The high costs of replacing valued employees mean a small business can really take a hit if they ignore keeping their employees happy and motivated. Small businesses often have fewer employees than large companies, so losing a valued employee or having employees who develop apathy or don’t care is even more costly to them. The average cost of replacing an employee can be as much as twice their base salary, and if they are very valuable, it can be even higher.

    It is very important for small businesses to understand what motivates their employees. Understanding what employees want and ensuring they are happy and productive pays off in many ways and goes a long way to retaining them. As an employer, you can easily find out what your employees want and find a way to give it to them or enable them to earn it. Here are some ideas when it comes to employee happiness.

    Communicate that you care

    Employees should know and feel that you care. This helps foster a mutual respect and motivates them to perform at their best. Begin by using clear communication between management and staff. This will help to create a strong workplace culture. It doesn’t have to be expensive to send a positive message that you care about your employees. Little gestures such as providing coffee or having a holiday party help to communicate that the company cares.

    Make them feel valued

    Don’t hesitate to ask your employees for their opinions and feedback as this helps them feel valued and a part of your company. They can tell you what they need and want. Never make the mistake of assuming all is well when actually negative things may be festering under the surface, ultimately leading to costly employee turnover.  

    Keep things casual

    Allowing employees to go casual can go a long way toward motivation. This can be as simple as your dress code or allowing them to customize their workspace.

    Beef up benefits

    Here are some other considerations that can help keep your employees motivated. Choose and implement the ones that may work for your budget and your company:

    • Health dental and vision insurance
    • Flexible working hours
    • Paid vacation time
    • Flexible work schedules or work from home options
    • Tuition assistance
    • Day Care
    • Fitness center memberships
    • Team bonding events
    • Employee outings
    • Free snacks and coffee

    These are only suggestions but any gestures you can make that help them feel positive about the company and that they are valued will pay you back tenfold in employee retention, employee motivation and on your bottom line.

    Timothy A. Dimoff, CPP, president of SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Inc., is a speaker, trainer and author and a leading authority in high-risk workplace and human resource security and crime issues. He is a Certified Protection Professional; a certified legal expert in corporate security procedures and training; a member of the Ohio and International Narcotic Associations; the Ohio and National Societies for Human Resource Managers; and the American Society for Industrial Security. He holds a B.S. in Sociology, with an emphasis in criminology, from Dennison University. Contact him at info@sacsconsulting.com.

     

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  • Next up: Why Good Design Is Good Business
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  • Why Good Design Is Good Business

    It takes less than a second for someone to form an opinion of you based on what they see. This means your website, marketing campaigns and marketing collateral are a huge determinant in whether you land the account, customer or investor you’ve been vying for. I am fortunate to carry the title of Creative Marketing Manager, a.k.a Graphic Designer at Outreach Promotional Solutions so I spend a lot of time educating my clients on the importance of good design. While a design investment for your business might not signal a clear ROI, it is crucial for gaining traction with almost any campaign.

    It takes less than a second for someone to form an opinion of you based on what they see. This means your website, marketing campaigns and marketing collateral are a huge determinant in whether you land the account, customer or investor you’ve been vying for.

    I am fortunate to carry the title of Creative Marketing Manager, a.k.a Graphic Designer at Outreach Promotional Solutions so I spend a lot of time educating my clients on the importance of good design. While a design investment for your business might not signal a clear ROI, it is crucial for gaining traction with almost any campaign. 

    I get it. As a business owner or marketing leader, you have hundreds of concerns to deal with on a day-to-day basis. It’s tempting to ignore the need for clean, aesthetically pleasing designs; however, recognizing the value can be an integral step in establishing and growing your brand. Learn more from us in these four points about good design below. 

    Good Design Tells Your Brand’s Story

    Your brand should tell the story of your business, i.e., who you are and why you are passionate about what you do. This goes beyond a logo and a website. Tell your clients why they should purchase a product or service from you. Each individual has a story that makes them unique, just as each business has a story that speaks to their integrity, passion and credibility. Your story should make someone have an emotional reaction and can create an experience. Let your design do the talking. Words can only say so much.

    Good Design Promotes Team Unity

    Establishing your brand with your customers cannot happen until your employees become brand ambassadors. Your creative space, website and stationery should all serve as a reminder to your employees of what you do and why you are doing it. These are the people who are communicating your values and story to your customers through phone calls, emails and meetings. Get your team on board with a firm understanding of who you are through good design, and the rest will begin to fall into place.

    Good Design Gives you Street Cred

    Okay, so maybe it doesn’t give you street cred, but it does establish a sense of credibility among your customers. Consider how many times you’ve looked at bad design and instantly decided the company didn’t quite have it all together. Your goal should be to look professional and effortless. Your customers and clients want to feel like they can tell you exactly what they want and you will have the know-how to tackle it correctly the first time, ultimately saving them time and money.

    Good Design is Memorable

    Good design strategically uses colors, typefaces, imagery and mood across all communication platforms to reiterate a message. The more they hear from you, the more your prospects and customers will remember you and think to recommend your product or service to others. Consistency will ensure a clear message is shared every time, without fail.

    Clean, attractive design shouldn’t be placed on the back burner when it comes to your business. Former CEO of IBM, Thomas Watson Jr. is known (among other successes) for his statement, “good design is good business.” We couldn’t agree more, Mr. Watson.

    Sean Miller is Creative Marketing Manager at Outreach Promotional Solutions

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  • Next up: Win the Security War
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  • Win the Security War

    Data security is a big buzzword today. How secure is your network? Get the knowledge you need to keep the bad guys at bay.

    Data security is a big buzzword today. How secure is your network? Get the knowledge you need to keep the bad guys at bay.


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