How to Build Your Business's Financial Gameplan

Shawn Turner |

With all of the day-to-day business operations entrepreneurs are faced with—product development, human resources issues, and business development to name just a few—it might be easy to lose track of a business’s balance sheet strategy.

“A lot of small business owners don’t understand their business’s costs,” says Brian Alquist, president of business consultancy 1Direction, Inc., in Brecksville. “Consequently, they’re really just focused in on the cash they have at the end of the month.”

But operating a business requires a much more comprehensive plan than just focusing on what’s left over when the month comes to a close, experts say. It requires detailed thought around the best way to think about setting financial goals and KPIs, access to capital, accounting best practices and more.

‘Build backwards’

One of the first things an owner needs to do is settle on what the organization’s goals are, says Michael Foss of Foss Business Solutions in Lyndhurst.

“Build backwards,” he advises. “What are our current expenses? How do I want to grow? What do I need to do to achieve that?” Once those questions are answered, the business owner will begin to be able to form a clear picture of the sales (and gross profit margin) the business needs to obtain to achieve those goals.

This is where understanding your cash flow comes in, says Rion Safier of Rion Safier Accounting LLC in Beachwood. For a small business, cash flow is king and the company’s budget and cash flow forecast

“There are companies that don’t have an accounting infrastructure and the business owner is just flying by the seat of their pants and using their bank balance as one of their key drivers,” he says. “That’s not a good way of looking at it. What if your receivables are delayed? Your cash might be depleted. Only looking at the cash balance is not an indicator of the health of a company.”

Measure effectively

What businesses should be paying attention to is working capital, or the capital a business uses in its day-to-day operations and calculated as current assets minus current liabilities, Alquist says.

“That tells me how well they’re really managing the financial aspect of their business on a day-to-day basis,” he says. “If the company has some level of capital invested in the business, I would also look at the ratio of depreciation to expenses. That tells me if they are investing or reinvesting in the business.”